Recent Recipes

Honey Lime Simple Fruit Salad

Honey Lime Simple Fruit Salad

Honey Lime Simple Fruit Salad You don’t need to wait for the summer grilling season to begin to enjoy a delicious fruit salad. Anytime is a good time to indulge in fruit. Maybe even more so now with all of us under “house arrest” and 

Chicken n’ Dumplings, Bisquick Style

Chicken n’ Dumplings, Bisquick Style

Chicken n’ Dumplings, Bisquick Style With all of us being confined to our homes and limiting our contact with the “outside” world. The question everyone is asking, “What are we going to eat?” Instead of ordering “curbside” dinners for the term of our qurentine. It’s 

Guinness Oven Baked Beef Stew

Guinness Oven Baked Beef Stew

Guinness Oven Baked Beef Stew

On the menu today is Guinness Oven Baked Beef Stew. Today is St. Patrick’s Day and I can’t think of a better way to celebrate than with a  big bowl of beef stew served with a slice of fresh baked hearty bread. To celebrate this Irish holiday even further, we’ve added two bottles of Guinness Beer to our stew. This stew is packed with “good for you vegetables” such as turnips, parsnips and cabbage. Get ready to indulge in a bowl of comfort.


Guinness
Beer

Guinness is a dark Irish dry stout that originated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness at St James’s Gate, Dublin Ireland, in 1759. It’s one of the most successful beer brands worldwide. It’s considered the beer of Ireland and is still the best selling alcoholic drink in Ireland. The Guinness Storehouse is a tourist attraction since opening it’s doors to the public in 2000, with over 20 million visitors so far..

Flavor Components

The flavor of Guinness comes from malted barley and roasted unmalted barley. For many years, a portion of the aged brew was blended with freshly brewed beer to give it a sharp lactic acid flavor. Guinness still features a characteristic “tang” and the draught beer’s thick, creamy head comes from mixing the beer with nitrogen and carbon dioxide. Guinness stout is made from water, barley, roasted malt extract, hops and brewer’s yeast, giving Guinness it’s distinctive taste.

guinness

Wooden Casks

A portion of the barley is roasted to give Guinness its dark color and characteristic taste. It’s then pasteurized and filtered. From it’s conception in 1759, until the late 1950’s, Guinness was still ‘racked’ into wooden casks. In the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, Guinness ceased brewing cask-conditioned beers. Guinness developed a keg brewing system using aluminium kegs (referred to as iron lungs) replacing the wooden casks.

guinness

Culinary

Guinness Beer is used in many delicious recipes. It can give a simple stew an added layer of richness and deep flavor. Guinness is super added to beer bread. We recently purchased a box of Guinness Beer Bread. We served Yogurt Dill Dip with Guinness Beer Bread  and loved it!  A few favorite recipes using Guinness are; Cranberry Walnut Irish Soda Bread Muffins, Braised Short Ribs, Dublin Coddle Sausage Rolls and The Dublin Dagwood. You can find all of these delicious recipes at Guinness Recipes.

 

Pouring into the Glass

According to Esquire Magazine, a pint of Guinness should be served in a slightly tulip shaped pint glass, as opposed to the taller European tulip glass. To begin the pour, the server holds the glass at a 45 degree angle below the tap and fills the glass 3/4 full. The beer is forced out of the tap at a high speed through a five-hole disc plate in the end of the tap. This creates friction and forces the creation of small nitrogen bubbles, which form a creamy head.

When Guinness is poured, the gas bubbles appear to travel downwards in the glass. This effect is attributed to drag; bubbles that touch the walls of the glass are slowed in their travel upwards. As beer rises in the center, the beer on the outside of the glass falls. This downward flow pushes the bubbles in the glass towards the bottom. This phenomenon occurs in any liquid, but is more noticeable in any dark stout, as the dark colored beer combines with light colored bubbles.

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